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三月, 2020

cover crops

BE THE CHANGE

Winter cover cropping with grasses and legumes is only one of the many ways that California winegrowers are fostering a healthier planet. Cover crops minimize erosion, provide habitat for beneficial insects and help keep carbon in the soil—so-called carbon sequestration—by feeding earthworms and other essential soil microorganisms. Climate change is top-of-mind for vintners, who, like the state’s other farmers, have to contend with extended drought. By any measure, the wine industry is a leader in demonstrating how thoughtful, sustainable agriculture can be part of the solution. When you choose Certified California Sustainable wine, you are using your buying power to help the wine industry combat climate change.

The Pour

Which Wine?

It’s long past time to bust the myth that artichokes don’t go with wine. All you need is a bridge. Pasta, bread, rice, farro, couscous or polenta can be that connector, helping mute the effect of cynarin, the compound in artichokes that can affect the taste of wine (and water, too). A plain steamed artichoke may not be wine’s best friend, but prepare a stuffed artichoke, artichoke pasta or artichoke risotto and that’s prime time for wine. With this spring pasta dish, open a California Sauvignon Blanc, preferably from a Certified California Sustainable producer. Napa Valley and Lake County are among the areas where this variety excels.

Meet the Grapes: Explore more wine pairings


The Recipe

Pappardelle with Artichokes, Peas, and Prosciutto

This pasta dish is perfectly wine friendly thanks to an assist from pasta, sweet peas and meaty prosciutto. Chill a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc and prove it to yourself. If you can’t find fresh baby artichokes, substitute frozen artichoke hearts rather than marinated hearts.

Wine suggestion: California Sauvignon Blanc or California Chardonnay

Pappardelle with Artichokes, Peas, and Prosciutto

Ingredients

  • ¾ pound (340 g) fresh pappardelle or fresh egg pasta sheets or ½ pound (225 g) dried pappardelle
  • 14 to 16 fresh baby artichokes, about 1-1/2 ounces (40 g) each, or 1 package (9 oz/ 250 g) frozen artichoke hearts (see Note)
  • 1 lemon
  • 6 tablespoons (90 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, minced
  • Pinch hot red pepper flakes
  • 1 sprig fresh mint
  • Kosher or sea salt
  • 1 cup (150 g) shelled English peas or frozen petite peas, thawed enough to separate
  • 2 ounces (55 g) thinly sliced prosciutto di Parma, shredded by hand
  • Freshly grated pecorino or Parmigiano Reggiano cheese

Serves 4

做法

If using fresh egg pasta sheets, start at one of the sheet’s narrow ends and loosely roll the sheet like a jelly roll, leaving a 1-inch (2.5-cm) tail. With a sharp chef’s knife, cut ribbons about 5/8-inch (15-mm) wide. Grab the noodles by the exposed ends, lift them up, and they will unfurl. Repeat with the remaining sheets.

If using fresh baby artichokes: Fill a large bowl with water and add the juice of the lemon. To trim the artichokes, peel back the outer leaves until they break off at the base. Keep removing leaves until you reach the pale green heart. Cut across the top of the heart to remove the pointed leaf tips. If the stem is still attached, cut it down to ½ inch (1.25-cm), then trim the stem and base to remove any dark green or brown parts. Cut each heart in half and cut each half into 2 to 3 wedges, depending on size. Immediately place in the lemon water to prevent browning.

If using frozen artichoke hearts, thaw, cut each heart in half, then cut each half into 2 to 3 wedges, depending on size.

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and hot pepper flakes and sauté until the onion is soft and sweet, about 10 minutes. Lower the heat if needed to keep the onion from browning. Add artichokes to the skillet (drained first, if fresh) along with the mint sprig, 1 cup (250 ml) water, and a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer, cover, adjust the heat to maintain a gentle simmer and cook until the artichokes are almost tender, 10 to 15 minutes. There should still be several spoonsful of flavorful juices in the skillet. Remove the mint sprig.

Cook fresh or frozen peas in the boiling water until tender, then lift them out with a sieve and add them to the artichokes along with the prosciutto. (Do not discard the boiling water; you will need it to cook the pasta.) The sauce should be juicy; if it seems too dry, add a splash of boiling water from the pot. Taste for salt and keep warm.

Add the pasta to the boiling water and boil until al dente. Fresh pasta will take only 1 to 2 minutes, depending on freshness. For dried pasta, consult cooking time on the package. Just before draining, set aside 1 cup of the hot pasta water. Drain the pasta and return it to the warm pot. Add the contents of the skillet and toss gently with tongs, adding a little of the reserved pasta water if the sauce seems dry. Add 1/3 cup (25 g) of grated cheese, toss gently, and immediately divide the pasta among 4 bowls. Pass additional cheese at the table for those who want it.

Wine Institute is an association of nearly 1,000 California wineries and affiliated businesses from the beautiful and diverse wine regions throughout the state. Wine Institute works to create an environment where the wine community can flourish and contribute in a positive fashion to our nation, state and local communities. For information please contact communications@wineinstitute.org.